Home » Vintage History: Wall Street: Where the Money is (1966) PART 2 documentary (finance, business) financial history documentary

Vintage History: Wall Street: Where the Money is (1966) PART 2 documentary (finance, business) financial history documentary

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Here is PART TWO of this Wall Street video. Narrated by Harry Reasoner. “Spoiler Alert,” there are No vintage computers in this film, it is uploaded only to complement the previous Part One of the series, which does show a few early automation type devices at Wall Street of the 1960’s. Its very dry but interesting historically if you like vintage finance or business from 1960’s. -Thanks very much.

-To See PART ONE, click link below:

Title: “Wall Street: Where the Money Is,” vintage 1966

Narrator Harry Reasoner (1923 – 1991) was a famous American journalist for CBS and ABC News, and one of the founders of the 60 Minutes program. .

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Vintage History: Wall Street: Where the Money is (1966) PART 2 documentary (finance, business)

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Vintage History: Wall Street: Where the Money is (1966) PART 2 documentary (finance, business)
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4 comments

Chethan Kumar 23/09/2021 - 11:35 Chiều

Great lesson

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Jimmy W 23/09/2021 - 11:35 Chiều

A wonderful film of some Wall Street history. Many thanks for bringing this & part 1 to us.

Although this film is 1966, the process of selling corporate or municipal debt hasn't changed a whole lot. The bidding process by the syndicates formed to bring a bond issue to market hasn't changed much, other than the electronic aspects prevalent today. It's still done via phone calls, meetings, road shows, and culminates with the published tombstone. I have often seen them framed or encased in plastic as souvenirs of a particular bond issue.

In early 1966, who was to know what Gerald Tsai would become. The fund that the late Gerald Tsai was establishing (the film never said) was The Manhattan Fund, which was sold to CNA a few years later, (to which Tsai became an exec VP) and in 1979 was sold again to Neuberger & Berman, that still owns it but under a different name (I believe NMANX). Tsai went on to become portfolio manager at the old American Can (a Dow Jones 30 company then), where he bought Smith Barney and the two became Primerica back in 1987.

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Franko Walker 23/09/2021 - 11:35 Chiều

And the rich just keep getting richer. Great vid. Thank you.

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Greg Hartwick 23/09/2021 - 11:35 Chiều

Fifty dollars a week – sweet! I’m set for life! I noticed that the blank space on the check, for the amount, was too small to fit 9 figures. I trust checks today can fit 12 figures. Ha ha! Oh, for the paper age gone by. Thanks for this.

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