Perez Art Museum Miami

The Perez Art Museum Miami resides downtown overlooking the Biscayne Bay with a glorious next door. I walked the perimeter of the park before heading to the museum, stretching my legs after a three hour drive whilst hoping to catch a better glimpse of the city. As I headed up the steps to the museum, I was struck by some slight, architectural similarities to ICA/Boston, but as I drew closer those faded far from my mind. Being in sunny, much warmer Florida, the Perez really engages with their outdoor space in ways that would be much harder to do in wintery New England. When walking up to the front entrance, I couldn’t quite make out where I was supposed to go as the staunch wooden doors were slightly intimidating.

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Sat under these for quite some time. Lovely spot by the water.

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Konstantin Grcic, “Netscape”

While the freeway will always be there, I’m sad to say that these great swings from Konstantin Grcic won’t (They leave in October). I didn’t get to swing on them either as they were dominated by numerous school groups by the time I made it outside. Even with kids running around and cars whizzing by, that outdoor space was oddly peaceful.

Diego Bianchi, WasteAfterWaste, Installation View, 2015

Diego Bianchi, WasteAfterWaste, Installation View, 2015

Shana Lutker, "Again Against, A Foot, A Back, A Wall", Installation View, 2015

Shana Lutker, “Again Against, A Foot, A Back, A Wall”, Installation Detail, 2015

This piece from Shana Lutker lit up from the inside as well, but it was tricky to photograph on the fly. I’m glad that they had her information on their website as there were no booklets available when I was there and I couldn’t quite understand the guard when he told me.

Gerhard Richter, "Abstraktes Bild (742-4)", Oil on Wood, 1991

Gerhard Richter, “Abstraktes Bild (742-4)”, Oil on Wood, 1991

After my initial good impression of this piece, the realization that this was a painting from Gerhard Richter made so much sense. I pretty much pin anything I see of his on my Pinterest art board.

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Nicolas Lobo, “The Leisure Pit”

Iman Issa, "Statue of King Ahmose"

Iman Issa, “Statue of King Ahmose”

While I might not have initially been blown away by Iman Issa’s sculptures, hearing the tour guide (who just happened to be in that room) discuss the story behind the work definitely made me look twice. Issa reinterprets historical objects as new form, but keeps the story attached to the piece (for example with what’s pictured above, the original is from 1549 B.C.E).

Back: Mark Handforth, "Western Sun", Florescent Lights and Fixtures, 2004  Front: Gean Moreno & Ernesto Oroza, "Drywood", 2015

Back: Mark Handforth, “Western Sun”, Florescent Lights and Fixtures, 2004
Front: Gean Moreno & Ernesto Oroza, “Drywood”, 2015

The Perez understands exactly how photogenic this piece is from Mark Handforth and encourages visitors to Instagram their photos of it. In true digital age fashion, I took a selfie in front of it, but I look way too orange for comfort to post that ANYWHERE. I absolutely adore work with light and was particularly fond of this room as it also had a sculpture suspended from the ceiling.

Robert Fabelo, "Anatomy", Mixed Media on Paper, 2012-14

Robert Fabelo, “Anatomy”, Mixed Media on Paper, 2012-14

Eugenio Espinoza, "Cuadrilatero (Ring)", Unprimed Canvas and Steel, 1971 (Reconstructed 2013)

Eugenio Espinoza, “Cuadrilatero (Ring)”, Unprimed Canvas and Steel, 1971 (Reconstructed 2013)

Simon Vega, "Tropical Mercury Capsule"(Detail), Wood, Aluminum, Tin Roofing Sheets, Cardboard, Car Seat, Plastic, Television, Fan, Icebox, Beer, Stereo, 2010

Simon Vega, “Tropical Mercury Capsule”(Detail), Wood, Aluminum, Tin Roofing Sheets, Cardboard, Car Seat, Plastic, Television, Fan, Icebox, Beer, Stereo, 2010

Unfortunately many of the other works that I enjoyed were under highly reflective glass or in rooms of tricky lighting. There were one hundred mixed (yes, literally 100!) media collages from William Cordova that I couldn’t stop trying to capture. A splendid watercolor from Xul Solar also fell victim to the dreaded glaring glass.

I enjoyed my visit to the Perez and would love to return to it the next time I’m down that way. I encourage anyone heading down that way to do the same, especially since it was so easy to navigate downtown Miami mid-day.

My only real gripe was that there were no postcards in their shop depicting any of the works on display. Sorry Muzz & Elle.

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